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LSAT changes: New format, additional dates

The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) has announced two very big changes to the LSAT, coming in the next year:

  • A digital format for the test. Beginning in July 2019, applicants will take the test on a tablet, rather than on paper. The test content will be the same—this is NOT an adaptive test like some you may have taken in elementary or secondary school (where the questions fed to you change depending on your answers on early questions). It’s just on a tablet, rather than on paper. For the July 2019 test, some test-takers will be assigned the paper-and-pencil version, while others will take the new tablet version. For that July 2019 test sitting only, applicants will be able to cancel their scores AFTER seeing them (rather than before, as is currently the case), and if they do cancel, be allowed to take the test again... read more »

When the September LSAT doesn’t go as well as you’d hoped

The early Fall LSAT scores are out, and some of you are perhaps disappointed in your scores. Here are some considerations regarding a possible November retake.

First things first: it’s going to be okay, I promise. This is not the end of your life or even your law school plans.

Your next step is to make a decision about a possible retake —you have until October 8th to sign up for the November 17th sitting.

That decision has nothing to do with how the September test stacks up against prior tests. It has to do with you, your test experience, and your career aspirations. So here are some thoughts to help you make that decision.

It’s important to first honestly and realistically assess what happened with this test administration:

Why you should make time for those visiting admissions counselors

I know what you’re thinking when you see that event listing for another visit from a law school admissions rep:

“I’m not really interested in that school.”

Or maybe, “I already visited the law school, so why do I need to talk to this rep?”

Or even, “They’re just trying to market their school—it won’t be of interest to me.”

Here’s why you’re wrong: there’s always good information to be gained from meeting one-on-one or in a small group with an admissions official. Yes, they’re definitely here to market their school and increase the number of applications they receive. But they’re rarely just narrowly focused on that. They don’t want to just increase the volume of applications but also the quality of those applications, and from their perspective, that means... read more »

LSAT test date changes—what does it mean for application timing?

For as long as anyone can remember, the LSAT has been offered four times a year, and while annoyingly restrictive, this provided a certain rhythm to the application cycle. All that changes this year. As I write this, many of you are taking the unprecedented July LSAT. More changes are afoot, with the fall LSATs moved to early September (Sept. 8th) and mid-November (Nov. 17th). The rest of the academic year looks different as well, with 2019 test dates on January 26th, March 30th, and June 3rd. After that, LSAC is hoping to move to all digital LSATs and offering the test every month except May and December.

So what does that mean for the timing of your LSAT and your application?

The law school admission process largely works on a rolling admissions basis, with decisions being made on at least some applications as they arrive.... read more »

Law school forums: What to know before you go

UPDATED JULY 2018

Should you go to one of the LSAC law school forums? What can you get out of these forums? All your questions are answered below.

What does a Law School Forum look like? It’s a large trade fair, basically. Imagine a large room, like the Student Union Ballroom or the big Campus Center Auditorium, filled with tables on which you’ll find lots of promotional materials, and behind which you’ll find representatives from almost every law school in the nation. There are also workshops focusing on the application process, financing, diversity, and legal careers. These workshops are led by both law school admissions officials and pre-law advisors from the local area colleges and universities. 

How will it be helpful? These events are most helpful to prospective applicants who are either still contemplating a broad range of schools, or... read more »

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