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Summer LSAT disappointment

Did the June or July LSAT not go as well as you’d hoped? Here are some considerations regarding a possible retake.

First things first: it’s going to be okay, I promise. This is not the end of your life or even your law school plans.

Second thing: it’s probably not worth your time to read all that stuff online about the curving of the scores, and whether that particular logic game was the hardest ever. LSAT prep companies and tutors obsess about those minutiae because it’s their job. Your job is to get into law school.

So your next step is to make a decision about a possible retake —it’s too late to sign up for the September 8th LSAT but you have until October 8th to sign up for the November 17th sitting. (Conversely, if you already... read more »

LSAT test date changes—what does it mean for application timing?

For as long as anyone can remember, the LSAT has been offered four times a year, and while annoyingly restrictive, this provided a certain rhythm to the application cycle. All that changes this year. As I write this, many of you are taking the unprecedented July LSAT. More changes are afoot, with the fall LSATs moved to early September (Sept. 8th) and mid-November (Nov. 17th). The rest of the academic year looks different as well, with 2019 test dates on January 26th, March 30th, and June 3rd. After that, LSAC is hoping to move to all digital LSATs and offering the test every month except May and December.

So what does that mean for the timing of your LSAT and your application?

The law school admission process largely works on a rolling admissions basis, with decisions being made on at least some applications as they arrive.... read more »

Law school forums: What to know before you go

UPDATED JULY 2018

Should you go to one of the LSAC law school forums? What can you get out of these forums? All your questions are answered below.

What does a Law School Forum look like? It’s a large trade fair, basically. Imagine a large room, like the Student Union Ballroom or the big Campus Center Auditorium, filled with tables on which you’ll find lots of promotional materials, and behind which you’ll find representatives from almost every law school in the nation. There are also workshops focusing on the application process, financing, diversity, and legal careers. These workshops are led by both law school admissions officials and pre-law advisors from the local area colleges and universities. 

How will it be helpful? These events are most helpful to prospective applicants who are either still contemplating a broad range of schools, or... read more »

Law-related courses for Fall 2018

Love the law? Awesome! UMass has a ton of law-related course offerings for Fall 2018. But remember:

There is nothing you MUST do as an undergrad in order to prepare for law school – no required classes or majors, no magic extracurricular activities.

Study what you love, pursue your passions, explore your interests.

You’ll find pages of info on undergraduate preparation for law school right here. 

Academics

Beyond studying what you love, the most important things you can do in the classroom to enhance your eventual application to law school are the following:

  • Learn how to be a good writer – take classes in which you’ll write a lot and get good feedback on your writing.
  • Maintain a strong GPA.  Studying what you love will make this much easier.
  • Get to... read more »

Law-related courses: Spring 2018

Just in time (barely) for Spring 2018 course registration, it’s our bi-annual list of law-related undergraduate courses being offered across the University.

But first, some caveats:

There is nothing you MUST do as an undergrad in order to prepare for law school – no required classes or majors, no magic extracurricular activities.

Study what you love, pursue your passions, explore your interests.

You’ll find pages of info on undergraduate preparation for law school right here. 

Academics

Beyond studying what you love, the most important things you can do in the classroom to enhance your eventual application to law school are the following:

  • Learn how to be a good writer – take classes in which you’ll write a lot and get good feedback on your writing.
  • Maintain a strong GPA.  Studying... read more »
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