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Free Money—SBS Scholarships

The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences has some $60,000 burning a hole in its collective pocket.  The fine people in the Dean’s Office are looking to give this money away to eligible students in SBS. For more info, visit the SBS Undergraduate Scholarship page or attend the Scholarship Workshop...

ABA Legal Opportunity Scholarship Fund

The American Bar Association’s Fund for Legal Education sponsors the Legal Opportunity Scholarship Fund.  This is a scholarship intended to encourage racial and ethnic minorities to apply to law school, and awards $5,000 of financial assistance annually to each recipient.  Additional information and the application can be found...

Free money for SBS students!

You may prefer the term “scholarships” but I like the sound of “free money.” The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences has a whole bunch of scholarships available to students, and a surprisingly small number of you apply each year. That is silly—quite literally leaving money on the table....

Easy money

It’s scholarship season at UMass, and there are at least three reasons I can think of off the top of my head that you should apply for every scholarship that comes around while you’re here. First, it’s easy money. Whether it’s $500 or $5000, it’s a bite ...

Decisions, deadlines and “Good Admission Practices”

The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) has long had a Statement of Good Admission and Financial Aid Practices that seeks to guide law schools.  They are not enforceable or binding rules, but merely “principles” designed to “improve the admission and financial aid processes in law schools and to promote...

You don’t need to commit just yet

If you’re like most applicants, you are unaware that LSAC recommends law schools adhere to certain “best practices” in the admissions process. Even though they’re not binding, the guidelines set out what you should generally expect from admissions officials as you navigate this process. At this time of...

Law grad employment numbers keep getting worse

The National Association for Legal Career Professionals (NALP) has issued its findings and analysis of employment trends for the law school class of 2010, and it’s almost all bad news. The annual NALP hiring report examines the employment status of law grads in February, nine months after graduation. ”[A]t 87.6%,...

Best time ever to pursue public interest law

Even though Harvard just ended its free tuition program for public interest lawyers, they, as well as many other schools, still have a very generous Loan Repayment Assistance Program (LRAP), and public interest lawyers from any law school can take advantage of the federal College Cost Reduction and Access Act. ...

What’s it worth to ya?

So there’s this raging debate in law world now about the value of a law degree.  Some law profs are arguing that it’s a million dollar degree.  Others are taking issue with that claim. Who’s right, who’s wrong, and what does it mean for...

No joke: More on law school employment numbers

Yesterday, I might have fooled some of you with my “LSAT waiver” prank, but today, I am forced to be serious again.  It’s about those post-grad legal employment numbers.  “Bleak” continues to be the best word to describe the job market for new lawyers, and it’s...

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