More Related Blog Posts

There are 0 blog posts related to "Are lower ranked schools more innovative than their higher ranked peers?"

What exactly do the US News rankings measure?

Let me be frank: If you can’t answer this question, then you have no business relying on the rankings.  Once you do answer the question, you’ll realize you have no business relying on the rankings. With a little research, you’ll find that US News’ methodology has...

Reputation surveys in the US News rankings

Turns out that only about 646 academics, lawyers and judges determine 40% of each law school’s rank in US News (the reputation portion).  And only about 120 of those are actual lawyers.  Just to repeat: that means that 40% of a school’s rank is determined by just a handful of lawyers and...

Law schools beginning to offer more practical skills training

Interesting article from the National Law Journal on a variety of new offerings at law schools to increase the marketability of their grads.  Certainly something to keep in mind as you are deciding which schools to apply to. Graduates face stiff competition for law firm positions, and clients are...

Rankings—all about the name?

Imagine a law school ranking in which the University of New Hampshire’s law school outranked Franklin Pierce.  Why would this be funny?  Because UNH is Franklin Pierce—UNH took over the private law school this past fall.  But in a recent survey that included both names, respondents thought that...

Gaming the rankings

Every year, law school applicants spend an inordinate amount of time obsessing about US News & World Report’s law school rankings. The Pre-Law website discusses generally why you shouldn’t care about the rankings.  This summer, the New York Times published an article giving a new set of...

Applications to Law Schools Are Declining

From today’s New York Times:Applications to Law Schools Are DecliningFebruary 9, 2006By JONATHAN D. GLATERHas law school lost its appeal?Last year, for the first time since the 1997-98 admission cycle, the number of applicants to law school declined, by 4.6 percent, and so far this year, the number has...

Guest post: Alum/recent law school grad working in tax law

Seamus Brennan graduated from UMass Amherst in 2007 with a B.A. in Political Science and a minor in History. He received his law degree from Rutgers-Newark this past May, and now works in the international tax law division of a prominent financial services firm.  Seamus recently contacted the Pre-Law Advising...

They say the hardest part is just getting in

And now, apparently, that’s truer than ever. In the last two years, at least 10 law schools have deliberately changed their grading systems to make them more lenient. . . .   But the tactic getting the most attention — and the most controversy —  is the sudden, deliberate and dubiously effective grade inflation,...

New website and resources on diversity in legal education

...or the lack thereof.  The Society of American Law Teachers and the Lawyering in the Digital Age Clinic at Columbia University School of Law have put together a website exploring racial and ethnic diversity in American law schools.  Their central finding: the proportion of African-Americans and Mexican-Americans among law students...

Step away from the rankings

Because they’re bogus. Because they are wildly manipulated by the law schools.   Because they may be destroying legal education.   And because they tell you almost nothing about what you need to know in order to choose a law school that’s right for you.

Page 1 of 5 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›