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They say the hardest part is just getting in

And now, apparently, that’s truer than ever. In the last two years, at least 10 law schools have deliberately changed their grading systems to make them more lenient. . . .   But the tactic getting the most attention — and the most controversy —  is the sudden, deliberate and dubiously effective grade inflation,...

The Future of Lawyer Hiring, Development and Advancement

NALP (formerly the National Association for Law Placement—the leading research and professional resource on law careers) is convening a series of roundtables to discuss a number of aspects of the future of lawyer training and job development.  Each panel is made up of law professors, law school deans, hiring...

Law schools beginning to offer more practical skills training

Interesting article from the National Law Journal on a variety of new offerings at law schools to increase the marketability of their grads.  Certainly something to keep in mind as you are deciding which schools to apply to. Graduates face stiff competition for law firm positions, and clients are...

The Future of Legal Education

Excellent, thought provoking article (PDF) from New York Law School Dean Richard Matasar in the New York State Bar Journal. Dean Matasar provides a concise account of the economics of legal education and legal employment currently and into the future.  I strongly recommend it for all who are weighing a...

Are lower ranked schools more innovative than their higher ranked peers?

It seems so, according to this observer.  One of his important points that bears repeating over and over again:  The rankings measure nothing remotely related to innovative or creative legal education methods.  Please keep that in mind as you compile your lists of schools to which you apply.

Applications to Law Schools Are Declining

From today’s New York Times:Applications to Law Schools Are DecliningFebruary 9, 2006By JONATHAN D. GLATERHas law school lost its appeal?Last year, for the first time since the 1997-98 admission cycle, the number of applicants to law school declined, by 4.6 percent, and so far this year, the number has...

Best time ever to pursue public interest law

Even though Harvard just ended its free tuition program for public interest lawyers, they, as well as many other schools, still have a very generous Loan Repayment Assistance Program (LRAP), and public interest lawyers from any law school can take advantage of the federal College Cost Reduction and Access Act. ...

Just how many law grads become lawyers?

The primary purpose of law school is to train lawyers—that seems to make sense.  But recent data indicate that a surprising number of law school graduates do not end up practicing law straight out of school.  Prof. Brian Tamanaha, who writes frequently about legal education, portrays these...

New research on LSAT alternative

The New York Times reports this morning on some preliminary research at UC Berkeley about an alternative measure for predicting lawyer success. Instead of focusing on analytic ability, the new test includes questions about how to respond to hypothetical situations. For example, it might describe a company with a policy...

LSAT: Retake or no?

You’ve just received your June LSAT score, and it’s not what you’d hoped.   What’s next for you — a retake  in October or December, applying with the June score, or putting off law school for another year? To seriously answer the question of whether you should retake...

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