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They say the hardest part is just getting in

And now, apparently, that’s truer than ever. In the last two years, at least 10 law schools have deliberately changed their grading systems to make them more lenient. . . .   But the tactic getting the most attention — and the most controversy —  is the sudden, deliberate and dubiously effective grade inflation,...

New law school employment data index

The good folks at Law School Transparency (LST) have published a new index of law schools evaluating their transparency with regard to their employment numbers.  LST staff reviewed the websites of every ABA-approved law school during the first week in January 2012, and evaluated how forthcoming each school is with...

New website and resources on diversity in legal education

...or the lack thereof.  The Society of American Law Teachers and the Lawyering in the Digital Age Clinic at Columbia University School of Law have put together a website exploring racial and ethnic diversity in American law schools.  Their central finding: the proportion of African-Americans and Mexican-Americans among law students...

Applications to Law Schools Are Declining

From today’s New York Times:Applications to Law Schools Are DecliningFebruary 9, 2006By JONATHAN D. GLATERHas law school lost its appeal?Last year, for the first time since the 1997-98 admission cycle, the number of applicants to law school declined, by 4.6 percent, and so far this year, the number has...

The Coming Crash in Legal Education

That’s the title of a new article from University of Baltimore Law Professor Richard Bourne, detailing the long slow train wreck that the combination of the rising costs of legal education and the stagnant-to-receding market for legal jobs has engendered.  Like any train wreck, it’s not a...

Just how many law grads become lawyers?

The primary purpose of law school is to train lawyers—that seems to make sense.  But recent data indicate that a surprising number of law school graduates do not end up practicing law straight out of school.  Prof. Brian Tamanaha, who writes frequently about legal education, portrays these...

Guest post: Alum/recent law school grad working in tax law

Seamus Brennan graduated from UMass Amherst in 2007 with a B.A. in Political Science and a minor in History. He received his law degree from Rutgers-Newark this past May, and now works in the international tax law division of a prominent financial services firm.  Seamus recently contacted the Pre-Law Advising...

Do rankings matter at all?

New article up from preLaw magazine, a publication of the National Jurist.  Good overview of the pluses and minuses of the various rankings systems, especially that of the infamous US News & World Report. (The link opens up a nxtbook reader in your browser.  If you would prefer...

No joke: More on law school employment numbers

Yesterday, I might have fooled some of you with my “LSAT waiver” prank, but today, I am forced to be serious again.  It’s about those post-grad legal employment numbers.  “Bleak” continues to be the best word to describe the job market for new lawyers, and it’s...

Alumni Guest Post: Some Pearls of Wisdom from a Part-Time 1L

Lauren Parry graduated from UMass Amherst in 2004 with a degree in History & Legal Studies.  She is now a first year law student at Rutgers School of Law Camden in Camden, New Jersey in the part time evening program.  She kicks off a new occasional series for the Pre-Law blog—...

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