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Don't be a law zombie: more good advice on personal statements

This time from Yale’s Office of Admissions, via the ABA journal. For all of Yale’s advice on personal statements, click over to their admissions blog.  It is definitely worth clicking through and taking a few minutes to read.  Take the advice to heart, no matter where you’re...

Is your Facebook profile part of your law school application?

Maybe.  According to a recent article in the National Jurist, at least 15% of law school admissions officers check applicants’ Facebook pages as part of the application evaluation process. (I say “at least” because of the way the survey question was phrased, asking officers if they “personally” had checked an applicant’...

Big Changes in LSAT Accommodations for Applicants with Disabilities

There’s great news for past and future law school applicants with disabilities: the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) has settled pending lawsuits with the US Department of Justice (DOJ) and the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) regarding accommodations on the LSAT. The plaintiffs alleged that LSAC...

Act like you're being watched.  Because you are.

One of the most enjoyable parts of the annual pre-law advisors’ conference is hearing law school admissions officials share their craziest application stories—personal statements, follow-up emails and other applicant encounters that are so unimaginably outrageous that the panel is titled “You’re Not Going to Believe This.”  The behavior...

New reporting process for university discipline

As you probably already know, almost every law school requires applicants to disclose their histories of university discipline (if any).  A handful of schools also ask students to have their undergraduate institutions complete an independent report of their disciplinary record, known most often as a Dean’s Letter or...

Not so happy holiday? The disappointing December LSAT score

The December 2017 LSAT scores are out (surprisingly early!!) and some of your are no doubt disappointed. Your array of options is clear, even if which one to choose is murkier: 1. Apply now with your current score. 2. Retake in February and apply at that time. 3. Apply now, but retake in February...

Guest post: The importance of a compelling personal statement

Rachel Morandi graduated from UMass in May 2010 with a B.A. in Journalism.  She is now a first year student at Suffolk University Law School. I began the law school process during the middle of my junior year. Like many, I decided to take a prep course that was offered...

Contemplating the February LSAT?

Tomorrow (Jan. 11th) is the deadline for registering for the February 12th LSAT.  If you are considering taking that test, keep a few things in mind. First, if this will be a retake, re-read the general information and cautions about retakes as well as my October post on whether to...

No joke: More on law school employment numbers

Yesterday, I might have fooled some of you with my “LSAT waiver” prank, but today, I am forced to be serious again.  It’s about those post-grad legal employment numbers.  “Bleak” continues to be the best word to describe the job market for new lawyers, and it’s...

LSAT prep materials available at Du Bois Library

Thanks to the generous donation from alum Josh Burday—a law student at the University of Chicago—the W.E.B. Du Bois library now has an extensive collection of LSAT prep materials available for review.  The collection includes various prep manuals, as well as over 60 full-length practice tests....

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