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Lots of debt and no income?  You’ve still got options

This is the second guest post from Radhika Singh Miller, who serves as program manager of educational debt relief and outreach at Equal Justice Works. Last week’s post looked at Income-Based Repayment options, while this week’s post explores options for avoiding default should you find yourself without any...

The Waiting Is The Hardest Part

Q: All my applications are in.  I sent in my financial aid applications and my FAFSA too.  Is there anything I can do while I’m waiting to hear?  Should I follow up with a phone call to the admissions offices?  What does it mean that...

More financial food for thought

Two more recent articles continue to paint a bleak financial picture for law world. Many recent law graduates finance their bar prep courses—and the eight to ten weeks of study post-law school with private loans.  A recent article on law.com tells how those loans are now becoming harder...

Is your Facebook profile part of your law school application?

Maybe.  According to a recent article in the National Jurist, at least 15% of law school admissions officers check applicants’ Facebook pages as part of the application evaluation process. (I say “at least” because of the way the survey question was phrased, asking officers if they “personally” had checked an applicant’...

Yet another new public law school in New England

Franklin Pierce Law School in Concord, New Hampshire has entered into an affiliation agreement with the University of New Hampshire (UNH). With approval by the ABA expected by the fall, Pierce Law will become UNH Law for the 2010-11 school year.  No word yet on new tuition levels either for...

New guide to law schools for public interest/public service

Equal Justice Works, the national organization for public interest law students and lawyers, has released a new resource that allows prospective students to compare law schools based on criteria important to those pursuing careers in public interest or government.  The online searchable database provides information about tuition costs, public interest...

Free money for SBS students!

You may prefer the term “scholarships” but I like the sound of “free money.” The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences has a whole bunch of scholarships available to students, and a surprisingly small number of you apply each year. That is silly—quite literally leaving money on the table....

Alumni Guest Post: Some Pearls of Wisdom from a Part-Time 1L

Lauren Parry graduated from UMass Amherst in 2004 with a degree in History & Legal Studies.  She is now a first year law student at Rutgers School of Law Camden in Camden, New Jersey in the part time evening program.  She kicks off a new occasional series for the Pre-Law blog—...

Step away from the rankings

Because they’re bogus. Because they are wildly manipulated by the law schools.   Because they may be destroying legal education.   And because they tell you almost nothing about what you need to know in order to choose a law school that’s right for you.

New reporting process for university discipline

As you probably already know, almost every law school requires applicants to disclose their histories of university discipline (if any).  A handful of schools also ask students to have their undergraduate institutions complete an independent report of their disciplinary record, known most often as a Dean’s Letter or...

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