More Related Blog Posts

There are 0 blog posts related to

Lawyers, law profs and law students—Mock Trial judges needed!

This November, the UMass Amherst Mock Trial team will host the Second Annual Thanksgiving Classic Invitational Tournament.  The team is currently looking for lawyers, law students (2d or 3d year preferred) and law profs to serve as judges for one or more trials. Judges will assess the competitors’ overall performance—...

LSAT test date changes—what does it mean for application timing?

For as long as anyone can remember, the LSAT has been offered four times a year, and while annoyingly restrictive, this provided a certain rhythm to the application cycle. All that changes this year. As I write this, many of you are taking the unprecedented July LSAT. More changes are...

The Waiting Is The Hardest Part

Q: All my applications are in.  I sent in my financial aid applications and my FAFSA too.  Is there anything I can do while I’m waiting to hear?  Should I follow up with a phone call to the admissions offices?  What does it mean that...

Law schools beginning to offer more practical skills training

Interesting article from the National Law Journal on a variety of new offerings at law schools to increase the marketability of their grads.  Certainly something to keep in mind as you are deciding which schools to apply to. Graduates face stiff competition for law firm positions, and clients are...

New guide to law schools for public interest/public service

Equal Justice Works, the national organization for public interest law students and lawyers, has released a new resource that allows prospective students to compare law schools based on criteria important to those pursuing careers in public interest or government.  The online searchable database provides information about tuition costs, public interest...

And so it begins….

The New York Times reports: You know things are bad when even lawyers are getting laid off. In downturns of years past, law firms exploited corporate failures and bitter, protracted lawsuits to keep busy and keep billing. But in this still-unfolding crisis, the embittered and the bankrupt have been relatively...

Law School Application Tip of the Week: Choose recommenders carefully

When you meet with your professor, internship supervisor or boss to ask for that recommendation, make it easy for them to say “No.” According to a new survey of law school admissions officials conducted by Kaplan, fully 87% said that they had received negative letters of recommendation for applicants.  This should...

The waaaaiiiiting is the hardest part

Until there’s a better waiting song, I’m sticking with Tom Petty to make my point.  Except we should change up the lyrics a bit: the wait list is the hardest part. You can find my basic advice for what to do when you find yourself on a wait...

Just how many law grads become lawyers?

The primary purpose of law school is to train lawyers—that seems to make sense.  But recent data indicate that a surprising number of law school graduates do not end up practicing law straight out of school.  Prof. Brian Tamanaha, who writes frequently about legal education, portrays these...

No joke: More on law school employment numbers

Yesterday, I might have fooled some of you with my “LSAT waiver” prank, but today, I am forced to be serious again.  It’s about those post-grad legal employment numbers.  “Bleak” continues to be the best word to describe the job market for new lawyers, and it’s...

Page 5 of 13 pages ‹ First  < 3 4 5 6 7 >  Last ›