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My applications are in, what do I do next?

Once your applications are in – including your letters of recommendation, Dean’s letters (if necessary) and transcripts, you get to relax a bit.  You will want to check in with each law school to make sure that they have your complete application, if you haven’t already heard from...

Wisdom from the financial aid panel

Summary of panelists’ presentations from the recent workshop on law school financial aid issues:What kinds of financial aid are available?Need-based aid (mainly Stafford loans, up to a Congressionally specified sum, currently around $20K), private loans, and merit-based aid.What forms do I fill out to apply for need-based...

Current applicants: Your December to-do list

I’ve come up with a little to-do list for those of you currently in the application process.  Let’s be clear: this is no time for procrastination.  I’ve already heard from several applicants who have not only completed their applications, but received offers of admission. If...

Law school’s value proposition

The debate about whether law school is a worthwhile investment got some renewed mainstream media interest this past week when the New York Times published an op-ed from Case Western Reserve Law School Dean Lawrence Mitchell.  In short, Mitchell contends that law school is worth the money. Several commentators...

Do I have to apply for financial aid?

Q: I don’t expect to qualify for any need-based scholarships.  Do I still need to fill out the financial aid applications?A: Yes.  It’s a pain, but unless you’ve got your full law school tuition squirreled away somewhere, you need to fill out the FAFSA...

The Waiting Is The Hardest Part

Q: All my applications are in.  I sent in my financial aid applications and my FAFSA too.  Is there anything I can do while I’m waiting to hear?  Should I follow up with a phone call to the admissions offices?  What does it mean that...

Easy money

It’s scholarship season at UMass, and there are at least three reasons I can think of off the top of my head that you should apply for every scholarship that comes around while you’re here. First, it’s easy money. Whether it’s $500 or $5000, it’s a bite ...

You don’t need to commit just yet

If you’re like most applicants, you are unaware that LSAC recommends law schools adhere to certain “best practices” in the admissions process. Even though they’re not binding, the guidelines set out what you should generally expect from admissions officials as you navigate this process. At this time of...

Lawyer-Alumni profile: Rob Shepherd (PoliSci/History ‘07, Quinnipiac Law ‘10)

This is the latest entry in our new series of profiles of lawyer-alumni, in which I ask attorneys to respond to questions about their career paths.  If you’re an alum who’d like to be profiled, please just send me an email.  You don’t have to...

ABA Legal Opportunity Scholarship Fund

The American Bar Association’s Fund for Legal Education sponsors the Legal Opportunity Scholarship Fund.  This is a scholarship intended to encourage racial and ethnic minorities to apply to law school, and awards $5,000 of financial assistance annually to each recipient.  Additional information and the application can be found...

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