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Current applicants: Your December to-do list

I’ve come up with a little to-do list for those of you currently in the application process.  Let’s be clear: this is no time for procrastination.  I’ve already heard from several applicants who have not only completed their applications, but received offers of admission. If...

LSAT test date changes—what does it mean for application timing?

For as long as anyone can remember, the LSAT has been offered four times a year, and while annoyingly restrictive, this provided a certain rhythm to the application cycle. All that changes this year. As I write this, many of you are taking the unprecedented July LSAT. More changes are...

LSAT changes: New format, additional dates

The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) has announced two very big changes to the LSAT, coming in the next year: A digital format for the test. Beginning in July 2019, applicants will take the test on a tablet, rather than on paper. The test content will be the same—this is...

Ninth Circuit rules in favor of disabled law grad

In an important case for people with disabilities seeking accommodations on the bar exam, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled yesterday that the National Conference of Bar Examiners (which is responsible for the administering the multi-state portion of the bar exam used in most states) must grant a series...

October or December LSAT?!?

Q:  I’m signed up to take the October LSAT, but I’m not feeling ready.  I don’t think I would do as well as if I took it in December.  Will it really hurt my chances of getting into law school if I don’t...

Last minute LSAT tips - January 2019 edition

First week of the Spring semester and last week before the January LSAT - what a combo! Here are some last minute tips for those of you taking the test this week. First off, it’s time to taper off from studying — there’s not much more that studying and...

After November: Should you retake the LSAT?

The November LSAT scores are out, and some of you are perhaps disappointed in your scores. How should you think about your next steps? First things first: it’s going to be okay, I promise. This is not the end of your life or even your law school plans. Your...

New Scholarship for Hearing Impaired Law Students

The George H. Nofer Scholarship for Law and Public Policy has been established by the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (AG Bell). One scholarship of $5,000 is available for the 2006-2007 academic year. Scholarship applicants must be accepted to an accredited law school as a...

New website and resources on diversity in legal education

...or the lack thereof.  The Society of American Law Teachers and the Lawyering in the Digital Age Clinic at Columbia University School of Law have put together a website exploring racial and ethnic diversity in American law schools.  Their central finding: the proportion of African-Americans and Mexican-Americans among law students...

COVID-19 and Law School Applications

Questions are coming into the UMass Amherst Pre-Law Advising Office about how the COVID-19 pandemic, and the responses to it, might affect various aspects of the law school admissions process. This post will be updated regularly with new information and new questions (and answers), but remember that events are moving...

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