Items tagged with "Legal Jobs"

There are 51 items tagged with "Legal Jobs".
The Coming Crash in Legal Education
That’s the title of a new article from University of Baltimore Law Professor Richard Bourne, detailing the long slow train wreck that the combination of the rising costs of legal education and the stagnant-to-receding market for legal jobs has engendered.  Like any train wreck, it’s not a...
New law school employment data index
The good folks at Law School Transparency (LST) have published a new index of law schools evaluating their transparency with regard to their employment numbers.  LST staff reviewed the websites of every ABA-approved law school during the first week in January 2012, and evaluated how forthcoming each school is with...
Thinking about law school
Why are you thinking about law school?  The most common reasons I hear are some variation of the following: I like to argue. I took Constitutional Law/Legal 250/Civil Liberties/etc. and it was mind-blowing. Law is so fascinating. I want a reliable, interesting job. I want to make...
Just how many law grads become lawyers?
The primary purpose of law school is to train lawyers—that seems to make sense.  But recent data indicate that a surprising number of law school graduates do not end up practicing law straight out of school.  Prof. Brian Tamanaha, who writes frequently about legal education, portrays these...
Resources for researching legal careers
There are a number of published resources for finding out more about different legal careers—so many that it would be impossible to list them all.  But here are a few that we’ve found especially helpful: Online resources NALP: The National Association of Legal Career Professionals NALP is...
Internships
Internships—paid, for credit, or entirely volunteer—are the best way to get experience in a legal field before making the big decision about whether law school is the right path to the career you want to pursue. The answer to the question, “Should I do an internship?” is always,...
Legal careers not requiring a law degree
Individuals without law degrees who work in law-related careers generally either work as paralegals, legal assistants and legal secretaries, and/or in any of a number of positions in the criminal justice fields. There are also a number of law-related career paths for social work and mental health professionals in...
Academia
Almost all professors in law schools have a law degree.  Traditionally, this was the only academic credential necessary for teaching in law schools, but in the last decade or so, a growing percentage of law professors have PhDs in addition to or instead of JDs—about 25% of professors at...
Politics
A substantial portion of individuals in elected office have law degrees – for example, roughly one-third of members of Congress went to law school.  As well, many high-ranking elected and appointed officials within the executive branch (at both the state and federal level) are lawyers, and, of course, nearly 100% of...
Regional vs. national firms
Law firms can be either regional or local in their reach, or national or even global.  Much depends on the size of the firm, the area(s) of law in which they practice, and the nature of their clients’ industries and needs. Lawyers who work interstate or internationally must...
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