Items tagged with "Lsac"

There are 9 items tagged with "Lsac".
Financing law school
Attending law school is extremely expensive. Tuition and fees at a private law school, plus living expenses and books, can run to nearly $100,000 per year. Only the wealthiest students can afford to pay this amount as they go through three years of law school. Most law students have to borrow...
Overview
The law school application process should ideally begin about a year and a half before you intend to start law school.  At that time, you’d want to think about when to take the LSAT and how to prepare, who you’ll ask for letters of recommendation, and where...
Transcripts
Every law school requires that you forward your complete official undergraduate transcript to LSAC’s Credential Assembly Service.  CAS will both forward your transcript(s) to the law schools you apply to, as well as recalculate your GPA based on certain uniform rules for its law school report. You’...
Letters of Recommendation
Law schools normally ask for a minimum of two letters of recommendation. The best recommendations come from instructors who know your academic work well, who can evaluate your intellectual capabilities and potential to study law, and who can give specific examples of your stellar qualities. Try to get at least...
The New LSAT “Score Preview” - Is It Worth the Extra Money?
On July 9, the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) announced a new “score preview” service. Beginning with the August 29, 2020 test, first-time test takers will be allowed to see their scores before deciding whether to keep or cancel them. But there’s a catch: the score preview service costs an additional $45, if...
Law school forums: What to know before you go
UPDATED JULY 2018 Should you go to one of the LSAC law school forums? What can you get out of these forums? All your questions are answered below. What does a Law School Forum look like? It’s a large trade fair, basically. Imagine a large room, like the Student Union...
LORs: Hard copy or electronic?
With this admission cycle, the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) for the first time began allowing recommenders to submit their letters electronically.  When you (the applicant) enter your recommenders’ information in the Credential Assembly Service (CAS), you can either generate an email to the recommender with a link for...
Researching law schools
Once you have decided what you want from a law school, then you can begin to narrow your search. Application fees range from $50 to $90, in addition to the $45 per school that LSAC charges. Being selective saves you time and money. (Please note, though, that many, possibly most, law schools offer...
Credential Assembly Service (CAS)
The Credential Assembly Service (CAS) is a service of LSAC,  and serves as a kind of clearinghouse of information related to your application. CAS centralizes all your data, including your academic record, your LSAT score(s) and your letters of recommendation. In addition, access to online law school applications...