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Dean’s Certification or Letter

A handful of law schools still require a “Dean’s Certification” or “Dean’s Letter” as part of the application process. This is a letter from the undergraduate institution that details the applicant’s student conduct (sometimes referred to as “disciplinary”) record (if any) and, in some cases, confirms the...

Face down your worst case scenarios

This is probably the most successful and most popular stress management tool used by litigators and other lawyers.  Part of your job as an advocate will be to help your client weigh the advantages and disadvantages of various courses of actions, and to objectively predict and plan for the...

Transcripts

Every law school requires that you forward your complete official undergraduate transcript to LSAC’s Credential Assembly Service.  CAS will both forward your transcript(s) to the law schools you apply to, as well as recalculate your GPA based on certain uniform rules. This includes the transcript from every...

Researching law schools

Once you have decided what you want from a law school, then you can begin to narrow your search. Application fees range from $50 to $90. Being selective saves you time and money. (Please note, though, that fee waivers are often available for applications.) However, don’t put all your eggs in...

Finding balance

There are two main elements to finding balance between your work (applications, LSAT prep, law school, and eventually, lawyering) and the rest of your life.  The first is developing and using good time management skills. The second is finding fun, healthy and productive things to do with the non-work...

Overview

The law school application process should ideally begin about a year and a half before you intend to start law school.  At that time, you’d want to think about when to take the LSAT and how to prepare, who you’ll ask for letters of recommendation, and where...

Law school admission decisions

Most law schools first rank applicants based on an index calculated from the LSAT and GPA. Each school determines its own formula for weighting these factors, but in general, the LSAT weighs more heavily than the GPA. Based on the index, the applicant pool is divided into three categories: presumptive...

Finding a healthy outlet

Both your brain and your body need to take a break from the work of your law school applications, and vegging out in front of the TV, surfing the internet and hanging out on Facebook can only get you so far (and sitting on the couch doesn’t exactly switch...

Personal Statements

After your LSAT and GPA, your personal statement is the most important part of your law school applications. You should plan to spend a significant amount of time on it. While every personal statement is, by its nature, different, there are a few basic points to keep in mind as...

Application Check List

The Check List for Fall 2018 Admission is organized topically. Click here to get the same list organized chronologically. This Check List assumes you have already made the firm decision to apply to law school after a thorough investigation of the law, legal careers and the financial implications/consequences.  The...

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