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Addenda

There are a handful of questions on almost every law school application that require elaboration in an attached statement, or addendum, if the applicant answers the question in the affirmative. The three most common addendum questions involve academic challenges, college disciplinary or criminal records (also known as Character and Fitness...

Fee waivers

LSAC will grant fee waivers to applicants with demonstrated financial need. Information regarding the fee waiver application process can be found here. The application must be submitted very early in order to be considered, usually six weeks prior to the regular LSAT registration deadline. If LSAC grants your fee waiver,...

The LSAT (Law School Admission Test)

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is an admission requirement for almost* all ABA-accredited law schools in the United States. Beginning in July 2019, the LSAT switched to an all-digital format and is offered nine times a year (every month except May, August, and December). The test is administered by the...

Overview

The law school application process should ideally begin about a year and a half before you intend to start law school.  At that time, you’d want to think about when to take the LSAT and how to prepare, who you’ll ask for letters of recommendation, and where...

When should I take the LSAT?

The LSAT is offered 9 times a year (generally once a month except May, December, and either August or September). You should take the LSAT no later than the summer or fall of the year in which you intend to apply, a full year (or more) before you intend to begin...

Just how important is the LSAT?

For a number of reasons, both good and bad, law school admission committees rely heavily on the LSAT (and undergraduate GPA) in making their admission decisions. Do not fool yourself into believing that the rest of your application is so strong that it will cause the law school to overlook...

Optional essays

A handful of law schools offer students the opportunity to write so-called “optional” essays. For example, Northeastern University School of Law “encourages” (but does not require) you to submit an additional one-page essay telling them either about your commitment to social change, how you would use their co-ops (internships), or...

Tips for Recommenders

If you are a graduate student, faculty member or employer who is new to writing recommendations in general, or to writing law school recommendations in particular, this page is for you. Law school admission committees look to recommendations first to confirm their sense of the student’s academic potential, and...

How many times should I take the LSAT?

You should plan to take the LSAT just once, and to do your best on it that one time. In addition to the retake considerations outlined below, students who assume they’ll have a second chance if they blow the first test tend not to perform as well as those...

Accommodations for people with disabilities

Disabled students can and do become successful lawyers. LSAC will accommodate students who cannot take the LSAT under their usual testing conditions. For instance, you can apply to take the test with additional time, if you can document your needs. You can find the current LSAC accommodations request procedures here....

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