More Related Articles

There are 0 articles related to "Application Components"

How should I prepare for the LSAT?

What will the test be like? The LSAT consists of five multiple choice sections, each containing one of three different question types: • Reading comprehension questions (one section) • Analytical reasoning questions (one section) • Logical reasoning questions (two sections) One additional section is of one of these three types, but is not...

Resumes

Every law school accepts, and most require, a resume as part of the application package.  You should always submit one—it’s one more way to tell your story.  There are any number of resources available to help you create a persuasive resume, including the UMass Career Services...

Applying after taking time off

Applying to law school after you have been in the workforce may present some special issues. Among the most common questions for “returnees” involve letters of recommendation and the weight accorded a college GPA that may be years in the past. The second issue is the easier one to address:...

Just how important is the LSAT?

For a number of reasons, both good and bad, law school admission committees rely heavily on the LSAT (and undergraduate GPA) in making their admission decisions. Do not fool yourself into believing that the rest of your application is so strong that it will cause the law school to overlook...

Optional essays

A handful of law schools offer students the opportunity to write so-called “optional” essays.  For example, Northeastern University School of Law “encourages” (but does not require) you to submit an additional one-page essay telling them either about your commitment to social change, or how you would use their co-ops ...

Tips for Recommenders

If you are a graduate student, faculty member or employer who is new to writing recommendations in general, or to writing law school recommendations in particular, this page is for you. Law school admission committees look to recommendations first to confirm their sense of the student’s academic potential, and...

How many times should you take the LSAT?

You should plan to take the LSAT just once, and to do your best on it that one time. In addition to the retake considerations outlined below, students who assume they’ll have a second chance if they blow the first test tend not to perform as well as those...

Accommodations for people with disabilities

NOTE: On May 20, 2014, LSAC entered into a settlement with the US Department of Justice and the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing which resulted in substantial changes in the process for requesting accommodated testing. By its terms, the consent decree expires in May 2018. When we know what, if any,...

Disciplinary and criminal records

When you apply to law school, you will discover that most applications ask you about your undergraduate disciplinary record and your criminal record. The questions are sometimes very open-ended: those about your disciplinary record might ask for information about any time you have been disciplined either for academic or non-academic...

Nuts and bolts of law school tuition and financial aid

The first step in your financial planning is to figure out how much law school is going to cost.  Every school publishes its current tuition figures on its website.  Each school also calculates and publishes its annual “cost of attendance,” or COA (sometimes referred to as the “student...

Page 2 of 3 pages  < 1 2 3 >