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Applying after taking time off

Applying to law school after you have been in the workforce may present some special challenges, but remember that you’re in the majority: over two-thirds of applicants are no longer in college. Among the most common questions for “returnees” involve letters of recommendation and the weight accorded a college...

Just how important is the LSAT?

For a number of reasons, both good and bad, law school admission committees rely heavily on the LSAT (and undergraduate GPA) in making their admission decisions. Do not fool yourself into believing that the rest of your application is so strong that it will cause the law school to overlook...

Optional essays

A handful of law schools offer students the opportunity to write so-called “optional” essays. For example, Northeastern University School of Law “encourages” (but does not require) you to submit an additional one-page essay telling them either about your commitment to social change, how you would use their co-ops (internships), or...

Tips for Recommenders

If you are a graduate student, faculty member or employer who is new to writing recommendations in general, or to writing law school recommendations in particular, this page is for you. Law school admission committees look to recommendations first to confirm their sense of the student’s academic potential, and...

How many times should I take the LSAT?

You should plan to take the LSAT just once, and to do your best on it that one time. In addition to the retake considerations outlined below, students who assume they’ll have a second chance if they blow the first test tend not to perform as well as those...

Accommodations for people with disabilities

Disabled students can and do become successful lawyers. LSAC will accommodate students who cannot take the LSAT under their usual testing conditions. For instance, you can apply to take the test with additional time, if you can document your needs. You can find the current LSAC accommodations request procedures here....

Disciplinary and criminal records

When you apply to law school, you will discover that all applications have a “Character and Fitness” section, which asks you about your undergraduate disciplinary record and your criminal record. These questions generally mirror the questions that will be asked of you when you seek admission to the bar, and...

Nuts and bolts of law school tuition and financial aid

The first step in your financial planning is to figure out how much law school is going to cost.  Every school publishes its current tuition figures on its website.  Each school also calculates and publishes its annual “cost of attendance,” or COA (sometimes referred to as the “student...

University Discipline/Conduct

Law school applications ask about both academic and non-academic sanctions. These questions are generally open-ended enough to include everything from a suspension for failure to maintain a minimum grade point average to a minor housing violation. All can end up on your disciplinary record and/or your transcript. You should...

Applying to law school

You’ve done your research, and now you’re ready to apply to law school.  The process may seem overwhelming at first, but once you are more familiar with it, you’ll see that it’s really pretty straightforward.  These pages are designed to smooth the way for...

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