More Related Articles

There are 0 articles related to "Application Components"

Criteria for choosing a law school

What you’re looking for in a law school depends largely on your career goals—why do you want to be a lawyer in the first place?  But it also depends on a number of other personal factors, including geographic preferences, intellectual interests, and desired learning environment.  The...

The LSAT (Law School Admission Test)

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is an admission requirement for almost* all ABA-accredited law schools in the United States. It will be given four times a year in 2017-18 (June, September, December and February), and beginning in 2018-19, six times a year (September, November, January, March, June, and July)...

Law school admission decisions

Most law schools first rank applicants based on an index calculated from the LSAT and GPA. Each school determines its own formula for weighting these factors, but in general, the LSAT weighs more heavily than the GPA. Based on the index, the applicant pool is divided into three categories: presumptive...

Application Components

To the left (and below), you’ll find the primary categories of law school application components.  Within each category, there are several articles and links to additional resources that will help you understand each application component, and ensure that you are able to put together the best package possible....

Statements, essays, resumes and addenda

The typical law school admission process does not include a personal interview.  Instead, the admissions committees make decisions largely based on the documents you submit (along with your LSAT, transcript and letters of recommendation).  Those documents may include, in addition to the electronic application itself, a personal statement,...

Deciding where to attend

The law schools have made their decisions; now it’s up to you to decide which offer of admission to accept. How do you decide between the prestigious school that offered you no scholarship, and the somewhat less prestigious one that offered you a free ride?  Or between the...

Resumes

Every law school accepts, and most require, a resume as part of the application package.  You should always submit one—it’s one more way to tell your story.  There are any number of resources available to help you create a persuasive resume, including the UMass Career Services...

Optional essays

A handful of law schools offer students the opportunity to write so-called “optional” essays.  For example, Northeastern University School of Law “encourages” (but does not require) you to submit an additional one-page essay telling them either about your commitment to social change, or how you would use their co-ops ...

Just how important is the LSAT?

For a number of reasons, both good and bad, law school admission committees rely heavily on the LSAT (and undergraduate GPA) in making their admission decisions. Do not fool yourself into believing that the rest of your application is so strong that it will cause the law school to overlook...

How many times should you take the LSAT?

You should plan to take the LSAT just once, and to do your best on it that one time. In addition to the retake considerations outlined below, students who assume they’ll have a second chance if they blow the first test tend not to perform as well as those...

Page 2 of 4 pages  < 1 2 3 4 >