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Disciplinary and criminal records

When you apply to law school, you will discover that most applications ask you about your undergraduate disciplinary record and your criminal record. The questions are sometimes very open-ended: those about your disciplinary record might ask for information about any time you have been disciplined either for academic or non-academic...

Accommodations for people with disabilities

NOTE: On May 20, 2014, LSAC entered into a settlement with the US Department of Justice and the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing which resulted in substantial changes in the process for requesting accommodated testing. The consent decree was set to expire in May 2018, but in March 2018, LSAC was held...

Application Components

To the left (and below), you’ll find the primary categories of law school application components.  Within each category, there are several articles and links to additional resources that will help you understand each application component, and ensure that you are able to put together the best package possible....

Is law school a good investment?

Given the long term financial ramifications, it is imperative that you ask yourself this question. There is no universal answer—only you can decide whether, given a number of factors, law school represents a good investment for you. Among the factors to consider are the following: Why do you want...

Dean’s Certification or Letter

A handful of law schools still require a “Dean’s Certification” or “Dean’s Letter” as part of the application process. This is a letter from the undergraduate institution that details the applicant’s student conduct (sometimes referred to as “disciplinary”) record (if any) and, in some cases, confirms the...

Application Check List

The Check List for Fall 2019 Admission is organized topically. Click here to get the same list organized chronologically. This Check List assumes you have already made the firm decision to apply to law school after a thorough investigation of the law, legal careers and the financial implications/consequences.  The...

Applying after taking time off

Applying to law school after you have been in the workforce may present some special issues. Among the most common questions for “returnees” involve letters of recommendation and the weight accorded a college GPA that may be years in the past. The second issue is the easier one to address:...

Deciding where to apply

There are some 200 law schools in the United States that are accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA). Applying to law school is a costly and time-consuming endeavor, but not nearly as costly or time-consuming as attending law school. Since you will likely leave law school with a personal debt...

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