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Overview

The law school application process should ideally begin about a year and a half before you intend to start law school.  At that time, you’d want to think about when to take the LSAT and how to prepare, who you’ll ask for letters of recommendation, and where...

Statements, essays, resumes and addenda

The typical law school admission process does not include a personal interview. Instead, the admissions committees make decisions largely based on the documents you submit (along with your LSAT, transcript, and letters of recommendation). Those documents may include, in addition to the electronic application itself, a personal statement, one or...

Criminal records

All law school applications ask about your criminal record. The primary purpose of these questions is to fulfill the schools’ mandate to ensure that applicants for the Bar are of “good moral character”. In most states, your application materials will eventually be forwarded to the bar admission officials when you...

When should I take the LSAT?

The LSAT is offered 9 times a year (generally once a month except May, December, and either August or September). You should take the LSAT no later than the summer or fall of the year in which you intend to apply, a full year (or more) before you intend to begin...

Personal Statements

After your LSAT and GPA, your personal statement is the most important part of your law school applications. You should plan to spend a significant amount of time on it. While every personal statement is, by its nature, different, there are a few basic points to keep in mind as...

Optional essays

A handful of law schools offer students the opportunity to write so-called “optional” essays. For example, Northeastern University School of Law “encourages” (but does not require) you to submit an additional one-page essay telling them either about your commitment to social change, how you would use their co-ops (internships), or...

Applying after taking time off

Applying to law school after you have been in the workforce may present some special challenges, but remember that you’re in the majority: over two-thirds of applicants are no longer in college. Among the most common questions for “returnees” involve letters of recommendation and the weight accorded a college...

University Discipline/Conduct

Law school applications ask about both academic and non-academic sanctions. These questions are generally open-ended enough to include everything from a suspension for failure to maintain a minimum grade point average to a minor housing violation. All can end up on your disciplinary record and/or your transcript. You should...

Fee waivers

LSAC will grant fee waivers to applicants with demonstrated financial need. Information regarding the fee waiver application process can be found here. The application must be submitted very early in order to be considered, usually six weeks prior to the regular LSAT registration deadline. If LSAC grants your fee waiver,...

Grades

Earning good grades in challenging courses demonstrates academic excellence. Compiling an impressive record is a critical first step in the process of getting admitted to the law school of your choice. Avoid using the pass/fail option as it doesn’t give enough information to evaluate your performance in that...

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