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Applying after taking time off

Applying to law school after you have been in the workforce may present some special issues. Among the most common questions for “returnees” involve letters of recommendation and the weight accorded a college GPA that may be years in the past. The second issue is the easier one to address:...

How many times should you take the LSAT?

You should plan to take the LSAT just once, and to do your best on it that one time. In addition to the retake considerations outlined below, students who assume they’ll have a second chance if they blow the first test tend not to perform as well as those...

Disciplinary and criminal records

When you apply to law school, you will discover that most applications ask you about your undergraduate disciplinary record and your criminal record. The questions are sometimes very open-ended: those about your disciplinary record might ask for information about any time you have been disciplined either for academic or non-academic...

Tips for Recommenders

If you are a graduate student, faculty member or employer who is new to writing recommendations in general, or to writing law school recommendations in particular, this page is for you. Law school admission committees look to recommendations first to confirm their sense of the student’s academic potential, and...

Accommodations for people with disabilities

NOTE: On May 20, 2014, LSAC entered into a settlement with the US Department of Justice and the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing which resulted in substantial changes in the process for requesting accommodated testing. The consent decree was set to expire in May 2018, but in March 2018, LSAC was held...

Credential Assembly Service (CAS)

The Credential Assembly Service (CAS) is a service of LSAC,  and serves as a kind of clearinghouse of information related to your application. CAS centralizes all your data, including your academic record, your LSAT score(s) and your letters of recommendation. In addition, access to online law school applications...

Dean’s Certification or Letter

A handful of law schools still require a “Dean’s Certification” or “Dean’s Letter” as part of the application process. This is a letter from the undergraduate institution that details the applicant’s student conduct (sometimes referred to as “disciplinary”) record (if any) and, in some cases, confirms the...

Application Check List

The Check List for Fall 2019 Admission is organized topically. Click here to get the same list organized chronologically. This Check List assumes you have already made the firm decision to apply to law school after a thorough investigation of the law, legal careers and the financial implications/consequences.  The...

Letters of Recommendation

Law schools normally ask for a minimum of two letters of recommendation. The best recommendations come from instructors who know your academic work well, who can evaluate your intellectual capabilities and potential to study law, and who can give specific examples of your stellar qualities. Try to get at least...

Criteria for choosing a law school

What you’re looking for in a law school depends largely on your career goals—why do you want to be a lawyer in the first place?  But it also depends on a number of other personal factors, including geographic preferences, intellectual interests, and desired learning environment.  The...

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