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Financing law school

Attending law school is extremely expensive. Tuition and fees at a private law school, plus living expenses and books, can run to nearly $100,000 per year. Only the wealthiest students can afford to pay this amount as they go through three years of law school. Most law students have to borrow...

Learning more about legal careers

These pages outline only the very barest of information about legal careers.  There are three basic ways to find out more, listed here in declining order of helpfulness:work in one or more law offices, talk to practicing attorneys, and read more detailed descriptions of legal careers. Remember, this...

Working during law school

During your first year of law school, you can expect to log 12-15 hours per week in the classroom. The most often-cited benchmark for outside study time is 2-3 hours of study for every hour of class time. Please note that that figure is an average—some students will study...

Overview

The law school application process should ideally begin about a year and a half before you intend to start law school.  At that time, you’d want to think about when to take the LSAT and how to prepare, who you’ll ask for letters of recommendation, and where...

Internships

Internships—paid, for credit, or entirely volunteer—are the best way to get experience in a legal field before making the big decision about whether law school is the right path to the career you want to pursue. The answer to the question, “Should I do an internship?” is always,...

Addenda

There are a handful of questions on almost every law school application that require elaboration in an attached statement, or addendum, if the applicant answers the question in the affirmative. The three most common addendum questions involve academic challenges, college disciplinary or criminal records (also known as Character and Fitness...

Disciplinary and criminal records

When you apply to law school, you will discover that all applications have a “Character and Fitness” section, which asks you about your undergraduate disciplinary record and your criminal record. These questions generally mirror the questions that will be asked of you when you seek admission to the bar, and...

Criminal records

All law school applications ask about your criminal record. The primary purpose of these questions is to fulfill the schools’ mandate to ensure that applicants for the Bar are of “good moral character”. In most states, your application materials will eventually be forwarded to the bar admission officials when you...

Researching law schools

Once you have decided what you want from a law school, then you can begin to narrow your search. Application fees range from $50 to $90, in addition to the $45 per school that LSAC charges. Being selective saves you time and money. (Please note, though, that many, possibly most, law schools offer...

Nuts and bolts of law school tuition and financial aid

The first step in your financial planning is to figure out how much law school is going to cost.  Every school publishes its current tuition figures on its website.  Each school also calculates and publishes its annual “cost of attendance,” or COA (sometimes referred to as the “student...

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