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Overview

The law school application process should ideally begin about a year and a half before you intend to start law school.  At that time, you’d want to think about when to take the LSAT and how to prepare, who you’ll ask for letters of recommendation, and where...

Credential Assembly Service (CAS)

The Credential Assembly Service (CAS) is a service of LSAC,  and serves as a kind of clearinghouse of information related to your application. CAS centralizes all your data, including your academic record, your LSAT score(s) and your letters of recommendation. In addition, access to online law school applications...

Letters of Recommendation

Law schools normally ask for a minimum of two letters of recommendation. The best recommendations come from instructors who know your academic work well, who can evaluate your intellectual capabilities and potential to study law, and who can give specific examples of your stellar qualities. Try to get at least...

Transcripts

Every law school requires that you forward your complete official undergraduate transcript to LSAC’s Credential Assembly Service.  CAS will both forward your transcript(s) to the law schools you apply to, as well as recalculate your GPA based on certain uniform rules. This includes the transcript from every...

The LSAT (Law School Admission Test)

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is an admission requirement for almost* all ABA-accredited law schools in the United States. It will be given four times a year in 2017-18 (June, September, December and February), and beginning in 2018-19, six times a year (September, November, January, March, June, and July)...

Optional essays

A handful of law schools offer students the opportunity to write so-called “optional” essays.  For example, Northeastern University School of Law “encourages” (but does not require) you to submit an additional one-page essay telling them either about your commitment to social change, or how you would use their co-ops ...

When should I take the LSAT?

You should take the LSAT no later than the summer or fall of the year in which you intend to apply, a full year (or more) before you intend to begin law school. If you are still in college and plan to go to law school right after graduation, you...

Addenda

There are a handful of questions on almost every law school application that require the applicant to elaborate in an attached statement, or addendum, if s/he answers the question in the affirmative.  The three most common addenda questions involve academic challenges, college disciplinary or criminal records, and the...

Financing law school

Attending law school is extremely expensive. Tuition at a private law school, plus living expenses and books, can run well over $80,000 per year. Only the wealthiest students can afford to pay this amount as they go through three years of law school. Most law students have to borrow substantial amounts...

Disciplinary and criminal records

When you apply to law school, you will discover that most applications ask you about your undergraduate disciplinary record and your criminal record. The questions are sometimes very open-ended: those about your disciplinary record might ask for information about any time you have been disciplined either for academic or non-academic...

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