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Overview

The law school application process should ideally begin about a year and a half before you intend to start law school.  At that time, you’d want to think about when to take the LSAT and how to prepare, who you’ll ask for letters of recommendation, and where...

When should I take the LSAT?

You should take the LSAT no later than the summer or fall of the year in which you intend to apply, a full year (or more) before you intend to begin law school. If you are still in college and plan to go to law school right after graduation, you...

How many times should you take the LSAT?

You should plan to take the LSAT just once, and to do your best on it that one time. In addition to the retake considerations outlined below, students who assume they’ll have a second chance if they blow the first test tend not to perform as well as those...

Addenda

There are a handful of questions on almost every law school application that require the applicant to elaborate in an attached statement, or addendum, if s/he answers the question in the affirmative.  The three most common addenda questions involve academic challenges, college disciplinary or criminal records, and the...

Fee waivers

LSAC will grant fee waivers to applicants with demonstrated financial need. Information regarding the fee waiver application process can be found here. The application must be submitted very early in order to be considered, usually six weeks prior to the regular LSAT registration deadline. Fee waivers are available for the...

The LSAT (Law School Admission Test)

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is an admission requirement for almost* all ABA-accredited law schools in the United States. It will be given four times a year in 2017-18 (June, September, December and February), and beginning in 2018-19, six times a year (September, November, January, March, June, and July)...

Law school admission decisions

Most law schools first rank applicants based on an index calculated from the LSAT and GPA. Each school determines its own formula for weighting these factors, but in general, the LSAT weighs more heavily than the GPA. Based on the index, the applicant pool is divided into three categories: presumptive...

Personal Statements

After your LSAT and GPA, your personal statement is the most important part of your law school applications. You should plan to spend a significant amount of time on it. While every personal statement is, by its nature, different, there are a few basic points to keep in mind as...

Statements, essays, resumes and addenda

The typical law school admission process does not include a personal interview.  Instead, the admissions committees make decisions largely based on the documents you submit (along with your LSAT, transcript and letters of recommendation).  Those documents may include, in addition to the electronic application itself, a personal statement,...

How should I prepare for the LSAT?

What will the test be like? The LSAT consists of five multiple choice sections, each containing one of three different question types: • Reading comprehension questions (one section) • Analytical reasoning questions (one section) • Logical reasoning questions (two sections) One additional section is of one of these three types, but is not...

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