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Criteria for choosing a law school

What you’re looking for in a law school depends largely on your career goals—why do you want to be a lawyer in the first place? But it also depends on a number of other personal factors, including geographic preferences, intellectual interests, and desired learning environment. The following are...

Financing law school

Attending law school is extremely expensive. Tuition and fees at a private law school, plus living expenses and books, can run to nearly $100,000 per year. Only the wealthiest students can afford to pay this amount as they go through three years of law school. Most law students have to borrow...

Is law school a good investment?

Given the long term financial ramifications, it is imperative that you ask yourself this question. There is no universal answer—only you can decide whether, given a number of factors, law school represents a good investment for you. Among the factors to consider are the following: Why do you want...

Rankings

This is the criterion most often discussed by prospective law students and the most problematic. The rankers choose factors that they think are important, and then give them weight relative to one another to produce their lists. Those criteria may or may not be important to you, and are unlikely...

Researching law schools

Once you have decided what you want from a law school, then you can begin to narrow your search. Application fees range from $50 to $90, in addition to the $45 per school that LSAC charges. Being selective saves you time and money. (Please note, though, that many, possibly most, law schools offer...

Scholarships

Law school scholarships The posted tuition cost for any given school is just the starting place. All schools offer scholarships to some extent, and an increasing percentage of students are able to attend school with some kind of institutional grant aid. Think of the tuition number as your sticker price,...

Loans

Most law students finance some part of their education through loans. This overview should help you understand the different types of loans available, and their relative advantages and disadvantages. For more information on federal loans, the US Department of Education has an extensive explanatory website. Law students primarily finance their...

Private practice vs. public service/public interest

Another distinction among lawyers is between those who work in private firms and/or for companies, and those who work for government or in non-profit work.  The first type is generally referred to as “private practice” while the second is called “public interest” (or, occasionally, “public service”).  Attorneys...

Working during law school

During your first year of law school, you can expect to log 12-15 hours per week in the classroom. The most often-cited benchmark for outside study time is 2-3 hours of study for every hour of class time. Please note that that figure is an average—some students will study...

How should I prepare for the LSAT?

What will the test be like? The in-person LSAT consists of five multiple choice sections, four of which are graded: • Reading comprehension questions (one section) • Analytical reasoning questions (one section) • Logical reasoning questions (two sections) One additional section is of one of these three types, but is not scored because...

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