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Scholarships

Law school scholarships The posted tuition cost for any given school is just the starting place. All schools offer scholarships to some extent, and an increasing percentage of students are able to attend school with some kind of institutional grant aid. Think of the tuition number as your sticker price,...

The LSAT (Law School Admission Test)

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is an admission requirement for almost* all ABA-accredited law schools in the United States. It will be given four times a year in 2017-18 (June, September, December and February), and beginning in 2018-19, six times a year (September, November, January, March, June, and July)...

Optional essays

A handful of law schools offer students the opportunity to write so-called “optional” essays.  For example, Northeastern University School of Law “encourages” (but does not require) you to submit an additional one-page essay telling them either about your commitment to social change, or how you would use their co-ops ...

Applying after taking time off

Applying to law school after you have been in the workforce may present some special issues. Among the most common questions for “returnees” involve letters of recommendation and the weight accorded a college GPA that may be years in the past. The second issue is the easier one to address:...

Loans

Most law students finance some part of their education through loans.  This overview should help you understand the different types of loans available, and their relative advantages and disadvantages. For more information on federal loans, the US Department of Education has an extensive explanatory website. These days, students primarily...

When should I take the LSAT?

You should take the LSAT no later than the summer or fall of the year in which you intend to apply, a full year (or more) before you intend to begin law school. If you are still in college and plan to go to law school right after graduation, you...

Addenda

There are a handful of questions on almost every law school application that require the applicant to elaborate in an attached statement, or addendum, if s/he answers the question in the affirmative.  The three most common addenda questions involve academic challenges, college disciplinary or criminal records, and the...

Tips for Recommenders

If you are a graduate student, faculty member or employer who is new to writing recommendations in general, or to writing law school recommendations in particular, this page is for you. Law school admission committees look to recommendations first to confirm their sense of the student’s academic potential, and...

Working during law school

During your first year of law school, you can expect to log 12-15 hours per week in the classroom. The most often-cited benchmark for outside study time is 2-3 hours of study for every hour of class time. Please note that that figure is an average—some students will study...

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