More Related Articles

There are 0 articles related to "Application Components"

Accommodations for people with disabilities

NOTE: On May 20, 2014, LSAC entered into a settlement with the US Department of Justice and the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing which resulted in substantial changes in the process for requesting accommodated testing. The consent decree was set to expire in May 2018, but in March 2018, LSAC was held...

Overview

The law school application process should ideally begin about a year and a half before you intend to start law school.  At that time, you’d want to think about when to take the LSAT and how to prepare, who you’ll ask for letters of recommendation, and where...

How many times should you take the LSAT?

You should plan to take the LSAT just once, and to do your best on it that one time. In addition to the retake considerations outlined below, students who assume they’ll have a second chance if they blow the first test tend not to perform as well as those...

Fee waivers

LSAC will grant fee waivers to applicants with demonstrated financial need. Information regarding the fee waiver application process can be found here. The application must be submitted very early in order to be considered, usually six weeks prior to the regular LSAT registration deadline. Fee waivers are available for the...

Credential Assembly Service (CAS)

The Credential Assembly Service (CAS) is a service of LSAC,  and serves as a kind of clearinghouse of information related to your application. CAS centralizes all your data, including your academic record, your LSAT score(s) and your letters of recommendation. In addition, access to online law school applications...

Letters of Recommendation

Law schools normally ask for a minimum of two letters of recommendation. The best recommendations come from instructors who know your academic work well, who can evaluate your intellectual capabilities and potential to study law, and who can give specific examples of your stellar qualities. Try to get at least...

Transcripts

Every law school requires that you forward your complete official undergraduate transcript to LSAC’s Credential Assembly Service.  CAS will both forward your transcript(s) to the law schools you apply to, as well as recalculate your GPA based on certain uniform rules. This includes the transcript from every...

The LSAT (Law School Admission Test)

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is an admission requirement for almost* all ABA-accredited law schools in the United States. Beginning in 2018-19, the LSAT will be offered six times a year (September, November, January, March, June, and July), and by 2019-20, it will be offered in every month except...

Addenda

There are a handful of questions on almost every law school application that require elaboration in an attached statement, or addendum, if the applicant answers the question in the affirmative. The three most common addenda questions involve academic challenges, college disciplinary or criminal records, and the so-called “diversity” question. As...

When should I take the LSAT?

You should take the LSAT no later than the summer or fall of the year in which you intend to apply, a full year (or more) before you intend to begin law school. If you are still in college and plan to go to law school right after graduation, you...

Page 1 of 2 pages  1 2 >